Autumn in Cabot Circus Bristol #thursday doors

20201014_1532312020 has been a strange year for shopkeepers. In March all nonessential stores had to close in England. Although most stores were allowed to reopen in July footfall is still down in the shopping centres and malls. Customers are worried about their jobs, many have been put on furlough or on reduced hours. Others prefer to shop on line rather than risk catching covid or wearing a mask. Continue reading “Autumn in Cabot Circus Bristol #thursday doors”

Sheepwash doors/Thurday doors

Cottage white door with thatched roof #sheepwash
I was a bit disappointed to discover that the sunflower was knitted.

Now that lockdown has lifted we are able to travel a bit more. We decided to rent a small cottage on a fishery farm near the village of Sheepwash in north west Devon for a short break. The farm proved to be run mainly for tourists with alpaccas and Shetland ponies as well as fishing ponds that had been dyed an impossible shade of blue. Continue reading “Sheepwash doors/Thurday doors”

Hawthorn and the story of the May wishing tree #ffotd#ff17

This is my first flower of the day post for May so what could be more suitable than May blossom. In late April and early May hedgerows and fields in England are filled with the delicate white flowers of hawthorn. The hawthorn (crataegus) is a native tree associated with celtic folklore and especially with May day and the start of summer. Continue reading “Hawthorn and the story of the May wishing tree #ffotd#ff17”

Grandma’s bonnets or aquilegia #FOTD#FF16

Pink flower of grandma's bonnet #FOTD
Grandma’s bonnet from my garden

Aquilegia which has the lovely folk name of grandma’s bonnet is a flower I associate with the cottage gardens of my childhood. I am sure I did not plant them but one Spring much to my suprise my borders were covered with the delicate nodding flowers. I received a lot of undeserved compliments from neighbours. Continue reading “Grandma’s bonnets or aquilegia #FOTD#FF16”

Bluebells#fotd#ff15

This month my garden is covered in bluebells or wild hyacinths. They fill every spare space and their spreading foliage stops other flowers growing. However I do love the delicate bell shape flowers which carpet the edge of my lawn. Purists would object that they are the Spanish variety of bluebell rather than the more delicate British bluebell which has a thinner arching stem and a stronger perfume.

According to the National trusts top tips for photographing bluebells you should choose a cloudy day. Personally I prefer less contrast and the gorgeous sunny weather we have enjoyed in April.

White bluebells #fotd
Despite the name like their larger cousin the hyacinth they can be pink or white though this is less common.

At this time of year local woods are carpeted in bluebells.

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This post will be added to Cee’s #flower of the day photo challenge and Brashley photography floral Friday challenge #ff15

Cowslip #FOTD

Small yellow cowslip flowers #FOTD
Cowslips in the grass

I have chosen another bright yellow spring time flower for Cee’s flower of the day photo challenge. Cowslips (primula veris) are a relative of the primrose with a similar dark green wrinkled leaf  but the small bell shaped flowers grow from a single stalk. In the past the flowers were used to add colour and flavour to wine. Continue reading “Cowslip #FOTD”

Gorse FOTD

yellow flowers of gorse
Common gorse

I have chosen gorse as my flower of the day after reading that children used to use the flowers to make a dye to decorate Easter eggs in the past. In England scrub land is alive with the bright yellow gorse flowers. It is an evergreen shrub and the sharp needle like leaves make it difficult for animals to eat.

Gorse bush at the side of the road.
I spotted this bush on my morning walk along the Bristol to Bath cycle path this week

Here it is going to be a very strange Easter with the churches shut and friends and family unable to visit.

Easter rabbits and chicks

I would like to wish you a happy Easter where ever you are.

Home thoughts from social isolation

Oh, to be in England
Now that April’s there,
And whoever wakes in England
Sees, some morning, unaware,
That the lowest boughs and the brushwood sheaf
Round the elm-tree bole are in tiny leaf,
While the chaffinch sings on the orchard bough
In England – now!
And after April, when May follows,
And the whitethroat builds, and all the swallows!
Hark, where my blossomed pear-tree in the hedge
Leans to the field and scatters on the clover
Blossoms and dewdrops – at the bent
spray’s edge –
That’s the wise thrush; he sings each song
twice over,
Lest you should think he never could recapture
The first fine careless rapture!
And though the fields look rough with hoary dew,
All will be gay when noontide wakes anew
The buttercups, the little children’s dower
– Far brighter than this gaudy melon-flower!

This poem is called Home thoughts from abroad and was written by Robert Browning a Victorian poet who spent much of his life in Italy.  At present we are unable to leave the house except for short walks near home and I feel a bit as he must have felt when I think of the beautiful spring countryside all around. Unfortunately the thrush who sings each song twice over is quite rare but we do have blackbirds, robins,finches and rooks come to share our garden and I took this photo of red tulips on my walk this morning. The other photo was taken in April last year on Clevedon seafront.

Tulips in a flower bed #Sunday stills

If you need cheering up can I recommend this family’s  version of “One day more” from Les Mis  It is true that getting an online Tesco delivery slot has suddenly become the most important activity of the day.

 

Red tulips

 

This post will be added to flower of the dayFOTP a photo challenge run by Cee Neuner. 

and    Sunday Stills a challenge run by Terri Webster Shrandt.